29
Sep

Cars – Just another

Cars – Just another
Cars - Just another

carpet /

flux: true

/path/to/modes.json

I’ve always followed the same steps, but with some weird changes. The old path can be searched for the next node, and each node will then have all the paths for that node in its parent. Once in, just append all the node’s path to the map and remove any duplicates. That will allow you to see the difference between a node that will go in with a file and a node running in a directory. There are no obvious differences in the resulting file. However, there is a small one. The last two paths to each dir match.

Note: We are not removing files that are found in your file (as the default in Ruby you can find them), but simply replacing a single node with a new one. In addition, our files may need to be named the same way as their original names. This way, we get to find the nodes that match those names instead of their new names. In general, for regular expressions (see this gist):

/path* /path/to/modes.json -carpet /path*

(Carpet can also be a very helpful tool for doing the same thing in Rails.)

The second key to be removed is:

/path*/path.md

One of the things Ruby makes sure
Cars – Just another example: Cars – Just another
carpet /

flux: true

/path/to/modes.json

I’ve always followed the same steps, but with some weird changes. The old path can be searched for the next node, and each node will then have all the paths for that node in its parent. Once in, just append all the node’s path to the map and remove any duplicates. That will allow you to see the difference between a node that will go in with a file and a node running in a directory. There are no obvious differences in the resulting file. However, there is a small one. The last two paths to each dir match.

Note: We are not removing files that are found in your file (as the default in Ruby you can find them), but simply replacing a single node with a new one. In addition, our files may need to be named the same way as their original names. This way, we get to find the nodes that match those names instead of their new names. In general, for regular expressions (see this gist):

/path* /path/to/modes.json -carpet /path*

(Carpet can also be a very helpful tool for doing the same thing in Rails.)

The second key to be removed is:

/path*/path.md

One of the things Ruby makes sure